Dry Needling Course 'Extremities' organized by Uplands Physio Clinic © See the dates here.                                                                                

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Day 1 overview: start at 8.30 a.m. and finishes at 6.00 p.m.

  • Registration
  • The myofascial pain concept, prevalence and pathophysiology
  • Dry needling history, definition and physiological effects
  • Assessment of the ‘myofascial pain’ patient
  • Lunch
  • Dry needling safety; indications and contra-indications
  • Overview of the hip and upper leg muscles - anatomy test
  • Dry needling protocol and introduction to dry needling

Day 2 overview: start at 9.00 a.m. and finishes at 6.00 p.m.

  • Practical dry needling of the hip and upper leg muscles
  • Overview of the knee, lower leg and foot muscles - anatomy test
  • Lunch
  • Practical dry needling of the knee, lower leg, and foot muscles
  • Overview of the shoulder and upper arm muscles - anatomy test
  • Practical dry needling of the shoulder and upper arm muscles

Day 3 overview: start at 9.00 a.m. and finishes at 6.00 p.m.

  • Practical dry needling of the shoulder and upper arm muscles
  • Overview of the elbow, forearm, and hand muscles - anatomy test
  • Lunch
  • Practical dry needling of the elbow, forearm, and hand muscles
  • Review of the course and exam

Program outline:

This three-day course introduces dry needling as an intervention for treating a variety of diagnoses in the arm and leg. On the first day, Frank Timmermans will explain the concept of myofascial pain and its characteristic features based upon  recent publications. He will also present a brief history of dry needling and explain its potential physiological effects. Assessment of the ‘myofascial pain’ patient will also be discussed. The afternoon will begin with an introduction of the practical aspects of dry needling. Topics to be reviewed in great detail include safety, a protocol with checklists, hygiene aspects, indications, (relative) contra-indications, adverse events, and complications. After a break, a presentation will show the muscles of the hip and the upper leg with an emphasis on myofascial pain, specific tests, and dry needling techniques, followed by an anatomy test. The first day ends with a demonstration of the dry needling protocol as a practical introduction to dry needling.

On the second day, dry needling techniques for the hip and upper leg muscles will be practiced in small groups under the direct supervision of an instructor. Before lunch, a presentation will show the muscles of the lower leg, ankle, and foot with an emphasis on myofascial pain, specific tests, and dry needling techniques, followed by an anatomy test. After lunch, these tests and techniques will be taught in a practical setting, again in small groups and with direct supervision. Later in the afternoon, a presentation will show the muscles of the shoulder girdle with an emphasis on myofascial pain, specific tests, and dry needling techniques, followed by an anatomy test. Next, these are practiced in small groups under direct supervision. 

On the morning of the third day the shoulder and upper arm practical continues. Before lunch a presentation will show the muscles of the forearm, wrist, and hand with an emphasis on myofascial pain, specific tests, and dry needling techniques. After lunch these tests and techniques will be taught in a practical setting, again in small groups and with direct supervision. After the break the course will conclude with a full review and practical exam.

After this course the participant will understand and be able to explain*:

  • The history of  ‘dry needling’ and how it is different from other types of needling.
  • The concept of  ‘myofascial pain’ and its prevalence, features and pathophysiological hypotheses.
  • The different causes of myofascial pain and its predisposing and perpetuating factors.
  • Potential physiological effects of dry needling intervention.
  • The importance of elicitation of the ‘local twitch response’ during dry needling.
  • The role of an adequate history and specific physical assessment to diagnose myofascial pain.
  • A protocol for dry needling and safety checklists.
  • Safety, hygiene, infection control, indications, contra-indications, adverse events and complications of dry needling.
  • Recognizing myofascial problems and testing of patients with ‘hip-leg’ pains.
  • Dry needling techniques for ‘hip-leg myofascial pain’ patients.
  • Recognizing myofascial problems and testing of patients with ‘shoulder-arm’  pains.
  • Dry needling techniques for ‘shoulder-arm myofascial pain’ patients.

  *Note: Several articles and links will be emailed beforehand.

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